Tag: Racism

Slavery As the Scapegoat for the Black Community
Race and Victimhood

Slavery As the Scapegoat for the Black Community

"Turning back to the “legacy of slavery” as an explanation of social problems in black American communities today, anyone who was serious about the truth — as distinguished from talking points — would want to check out the facts. Were children raised with only one parent as common at any time during the first 100 years after slavery as in the first 30 years after the great expansion of the welfare state in the 1960s? As of 1960, 22 percent of black children were raised with only one parent, usually the mother. Thirty years later, two-thirds of black children were being raised without a father present. What about ghetto riots, crimes in general and murder in particular? What about low levels of labor force participation and high levels of welfare dependency? None of ...
A Good Catch Phrase Stops Thinking for 50 Years
Race and Victimhood

A Good Catch Phrase Stops Thinking for 50 Years

I've been thinking more deeply about slavery, well-meaningness, radical Left ideology, progress and our children, I find myself examining the many ways in which the well-meaning have created or hindered meaningful progress..As it relates to legacy and history and how the well-meaning and the not- so- well-meaning describe and teach it, it is becoming clearer everyday that in order for our children to understand their inalienable right to freedom, they must be able to receive and filter information from the perspective that they are indeed ALREADY FREE..It is those with ulterior motives who practice and trade in mental and emotional slavery which holds generations in bondage, to this day, by limiting truth, painting reality with broad strokes of manufactured emotionalism sound bytes,...
ESTHER KRAKUE dared to question the aims of BLM and received horrible racist abuse
Race and Victimhood

ESTHER KRAKUE dared to question the aims of BLM and received horrible racist abuse

By Esther Krakue When I first moved to the UK from Ghana with my family in my early teens, the country that welcomed me was one where multiculturalism flourished and neighbours were warm and unassuming. Your achievements were not prefaced by the colour of your skin or your place on the totem pole of identity politics. People from ethnic and racial minorities were not constantly looking over their shoulders and assuming that every social interaction was laced with disdain or racism. It was a Britain where confidence trumped victimhood. But, much to my dismay, the tone has shifted entirely, and worryingly, over the past five years. Now I, a 24-year-old black woman of West African heritage, am expected to be mortally offended if someone dares assume that my dark skin mig...