History

How historical events have shaped mindset and behavior

George T. Downing (December 30, 1819 – July 21, 1903)
Family Wealth, History

George T. Downing (December 30, 1819 – July 21, 1903)

George T. Downing (December 30, 1819 – July 21, 1903) was born in New York City. His father Thomas was born in 1791 in Chincoteague, Virginia, to parents who had been freed from slavery when their master, John Downing, a prominent planter, converted to Methodism. The couple took his surname and were also Methodists.⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀The local Methodist congregation named their meeting house in Oak Hill after Downing because of his acts. Downing hired Thomas' parents to serve as caretakers at the meeting house, and provided a tutor for Thomas. Thomas grew up learning about refined tastes from guests hosted by John Downing at his own house, near the land his parents were given,⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀George Downing was an abolitionist and activist for African-American civil rights while building a successful...
A Path to Regaining the Idea of Black Citizenship in the U.S.
History

A Path to Regaining the Idea of Black Citizenship in the U.S.

I recently watched an incredibly engaging interview of Bevelyn Beatty which I thoroughly enjoyed and in passing, and a question came up about how she became who she is today, how she came to know what she knows about American history, politics and race. She mentioned that a man by the name of David Barton was an inspirational teacher for her. Being the curator that I am, I immediately wrote down his name and began to look up videos of his talks. As a side note, I'd like to mention that I finally got a taste of Google censorship that I have heard so much about. When I input his name in Google search, the first page was filled with articles that debunked David Barton. I realized that Google wanted to discourage anyone from further researching him. But you know me. I did just that. Res...
If We Could Plant Them Upon the Soil
History

If We Could Plant Them Upon the Soil

"During the time I was a student in Washington the city was crowed with colored peopled, many of whom had recently come from the South. A large proportion of these people had been drawn to Washington because they felt that they could lead a life of ease there. Others had secured minor government positions, and still another large class was there in the hope of securing Federal positions. A number of colored men - some of them very strong and brilliant - were in the House of Representatives at that time, and one, the Hon. B.K. Bruce, was in the Senate. All this tended to make Washington an attractive place for members of the colored race. Then, too, they knew that at all times they could have the protection of the law in the District of Columbia. The public schools in Washington for ...
George Leslie Brown, 1st Black Lt. Governor
History

George Leslie Brown, 1st Black Lt. Governor

The Honorable George Leslie Brown was born on July 1, 1926, in Lawrence, Kansas. Growing up on a farm in Kansas, Brown was a star athlete in basketball, football and track before graduating from Lawrence Liberty Memorial High School in 1944. During World War II, he served as a Tuskegee Airman. Brown graduated from the University of Kansas in 1950 with a B.S. in journalism. He also did graduate work at Harvard Business School, the University of Colorado and the University of Denver. For fourteen years, he worked as a writer and editor for The Denver Post and hosted his own Denver radio talk show. He was the first African American editor to work for a major daily newspaper in the Rocky Mountains. Brown served as the assistant executive director for Denver’s Public Housing Program for f...
Thomas Sowell: “Slavery” as the Scapegoat for Strife in the Black Community
Deculturization, History

Thomas Sowell: “Slavery” as the Scapegoat for Strife in the Black Community

— Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. His website is www.tsowell.com. © 2015 Creators Syndicate Inc. Discussions of racial problems almost invariably bring out the cliché of “a legacy of slavery.” But anyone who is being serious, as distinguished from being political, would surely want to know if whatever he is talking about — whether fatherless children, crime, or whatever — is in fact a legacy of slavery or of some of the many other things that have been done in the century and a half since slavery ended. Another cliché that has come into vogue is that slavery is “America‘s original sin.” The great Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes said that a good catch phrase could stop thinking for 50 years. Catch phrases a...
Operation June Cleaver
History, Women & Marriage

Operation June Cleaver

On a recent chilly Sunday women started disappearing from ads, magazine covers, billboards and posters directing readers to Not-There.org. Part of a powerful ad campaign to raise awareness of gender inequality, it was a graphic reminder to women “we’re not there yet.” It’s a déjà vu for the real housewives of the cold war. 70 years ago images of working women suddenly disappeared from the media and it took them over 30 years to return. During WWII women might have thought that they were finally there…until they weren’t. Women went from serving the country to serving hubby a beer. L) Vintage ad Canada Drive 1944 (R) Vintage Schlitz Ad 1953 One day, dedicated working women were glorified, proudly featured in articles and advertisements; the next they vanished,...